In 1992, Ichikawa reflected back on the experience of making the film, in an interview shot at Tokyo's National Stadium, which had been built for the 1964 Games. Tokyo Olympiad (The Criterion Collection) Abebe Bikila (Actor), Jack Douglas (Actor), Kon Ichikawa (Director, Writer) & Rated: Unrated. In reference to a failed Japanese athlete, we read: “The rising sun flag will not fly. Often the cameras are hand-held, which is not necessarily to the film’s disadvantage: it is, after all, the way a spectator’s eye moves from one point of interest to another. Music director at Los Angeles’s KCRW radio station, Tom Schnabel started the daily program Morning Becomes Eclectic in the 1980s, first bringing world music to U.S. radio with such artists as Buena Vista Social Club, Ravi Shankar, and Caetano Velos. Exalting that part of the body that symbolizes the physical nature of the Games, a camera can linger for a full minute on a sneaker settling into a starting block. You'll also find in-depth discussions on world cinema. The Olympic Games have long been a testament to that sense of physical exceptionalism, and it’s hard to think of a better filmic showcase for that sense of performance than 1965’s Tokyo Olympiad, which just received a pristine Blu-ray re-release from The Criterion Collection (available today). From the rising sun of its opening shot to the nighttime flames of the closing ceremonies, Ichikawa focuses less on sports journalism than he does the mindset and physical poetry of the athletes’ performance. It’s an incredibly in-depth and rich discussion, a really wonderful read. The interview is peresented here in its entirety. A spectacle of magnificent proportions and remarkable intimacy, Kon Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad remains one of the greatest films ever made about sports. Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. Drawn equally to the psychology of losers and winners—including the legendary Ethiopian marathoner Abebe Bikila, who receives the film’s most exalted tribute—Ichikawa captures the triumph, passion, and suffering of competition with a singular humanistic vision, and in doing so effected a transformative influence on the art of documentary filmmaking. He would persuade eight prominent film   directors of the day (not including Leni Riefenstahl, whose great film Olympia, about the Berlin Olympics, had too many associations with Hitler and Nazism) to film an Olympic event of their own choosing. At the close, very little. The best item in the book, though, and one of the best in this entire release (only beat out by Cowie’s commentary) is a reprint of a symposium conducted through “electronic mail” (dating this release a bit) between a number of scholars, addressing the various controversies that built around the film. Not only that, he’d create one of the most vibrant, indelible sports movies of all time. Slow-motion makes runners look like they’re slicing through the air, every movement a symphony of strength and stamina. Often the music takes on a moody sound, the kind that usually accompanies someone opening a door in a haunted house. He loses out in the semi-final and then we see him in the mess hall, eating noodles, and the background music shifts from its Prokofiev mood to a sorrowful jazz saxophone. Occasionally, a sentence in English scrolls across the bottom of the screen, to identify what the commentator is saying. Jul 07, 2020 Web Exclusive By Ed McMenamin . Condition is "Brand New". These are “ten movies that taught me about movies,” writes filmmaker Robert Greene. In reference to a failed Japanese athlete, we read: “The rising sun flag will not fly. The physical ravaging of the human form under stress was far more interesting to Ichikawa than the outcome of the race. Spanning fifty-three movies and forty-one editions of the Olympic Games, 100 Years of Olympic Films: 1912–2012 is the culmination of a monumental, award-winning archival project encompassing dozens of new restorations by the International Olympic Committee. The big feature is Peter Cowie’s rather exhaustive audio commentary and it covers the film and the event from a number of perspectives. Remarkable consideration is paid to the feet, to track shoes (It’s almost a shock to note there are no Nike swooshes!). The footage shows its years. Contact the seller- opens in a new window or tab and request a shipping method to your location. #155: Tokyo Olympiad (1965), dir. To either read or join in on our discussions visit our forums. The athletes rush pell-mell out of the portals onto the field to celebrate, a few fireworks, and the crowds begin to wave handkerchiefs in farewell. Utilizing glorious widescreen cinematography, Ichikawa examines the beauty and … It’s also especially amusing when he gets into the various doping controversies. Press Esc to cancel. Some years ago I saw Visions of Eight, David Wolper’s documentary about the 1972 Summer Games in Munich. A spectacle of magnificent proportions and remarkable intimacy, Kon Ichikawa’s TOKYO OLYMPIAD remains one of the greatest films ever made about sports. Welcome to the Criterion Corner, where we break down some of the month’s new releases from the Criterion Collection. Drawn equally to the psychology of losers and winners—including the legendary Ethiopian marathoner Abebe Bikila, who receives the film’s most exalted tribute—Ichikawa captures the triumph, passion, and suffering of competition with a singular humanistic vision, and in doing so effected a transformative influence on the art of documentary filmmaking. It’s probably one of my favourite commentary tracks. Format: DVD. During the marathon, the camera shifts back and forth between what’s going on at the front (invariably the solitary figure of Ethiopia’s unflappable Abebe Bikila, far in the lead) and at the back of things, usually someone slumped to the sidewalk, or in one case carted off on a stretcher to a waiting ambulance. This disc has been out of print for a long while and still manages to fetch ridiculous prices online, so much so it would probably be more economical to just pick up the new 100 Years of Olympic Films box set at a half-off sale since it includes Tokyo Olympiad. I hope Criterion can somehow re-release the film with the track again. He would persuade eight prominent film   directors of the day (not including Leni Riefenstahl, whose great film Olympia, about the Berlin Olympics, had too many associations with Hitler and Nazism) to film an Olympic event of their own choosing. If you’ve seen any NFL Films or sports documentaries in the last half-century, you’ll see the visual signposts Ichikawa pioneers here in Tokyo Olympiad. There are also five additional scenes originally filmed at the games, each with their own introduction by Cowie and which have received their own 4K restoration. Actor, writer, and director Paul Schneider has long been a devotee of the Criterion Collection. The athletes rush pell-mell out of the portals onto the field to celebrate, a few fireworks, and the crowds begin to wave handkerchiefs in farewell. Kon Ichikawa picked the l00-meter dash. Classics and discoveries from around the world, thematically programmed with special features, on a streaming service brought to you by the Criterion Collection. He would persuade eight prominent film directors of the day (not including Leni Riefenstahl, whose great film Olympia, about the Berlin Olympics, had too many associations with Hitler and Nazism) to film an Olympic event of their own choosing. Claude Lelouch focused on losers, Arthur Penn on pole-vaulters, Mai Zetterling on weightlifters, and so on. Elliptical editing effortlessly glides us from one event to the next, with only short bursts of narration to lend context. The uncompressed monaural soundtrack also captures the organic audio of the Olympic proceedings while mixing in classical music and original score nicely throughout. George Plimpton, the co-founder of the Paris Review, a literary quarterly, is the author of a number of books, Paper Lion and Shadow Box among them, many with a sports background. An exhausted face. Occasionally, a sentence in English scrolls across the bottom of the screen, to identify what the commentator is saying. (Janus Films), Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window), Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window), Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window), Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window), “Yummy” is a gorefest without any real flavor, The quiet realism of “Paranoid Park” showed Gus Van Sant at his indie best, When Johnny Met Tim: Burton, Depp, and the Limits of the Muse, The True Villain of "Candyman" Isn't the Urban Legend Himself—It's Helen, Inside the blood-soaked Gothic romance of "Crimson Peak", Great British Baking Show Episode 4 Recap: "Chocolate Week", “Ratched” is exactly what you think it’s going to be, and worse. Motion is also very smooth, no choppiness or blur present and all of this together manages to give this as filmic a look as possible for the format. Viewing Tokyo Olympiad, Ichikawa’s film of the 1964 Summer Games in Tokyo, it is apparent that even then his main idea (despite the more than 150 cameras available to him) was to present a fragmented picture of the Games, rather than a news documentary. The footage shows its years. A fluttering flag. Wolper had an interesting concept. After watching the 1964 Tokyo Olympiad, one can surely say that Ichikawa is of that tradition. Claude Lelouch focused on losers, Arthur Penn on pole-vaulters, Mai Zetterling on weightlifters, and so on. DVD Tokyo Olympiad Criterion collection new. ), The background commentary in Japanese disappears for long stretches of time, rather like Wimbledon tennis commentators who seem to be taking the occasional nap. Viewing Tokyo Olympiad, Ichikawa’s film of the 1964 Summer Games in Tokyo, it is apparent that even then his main idea (despite the more than 150 cameras available to him) was to present a fragmented picture of the Games, rather than a news documentary. Shipping and handling. Get info about new releases, essays and interviews on the Current, Top 10 lists, and sales. There’s also a 31-minute documentary on how Ichikawa worked during the film’s production, complete with interviews from the film’s editor to camera operators to the director’s son. Indeed, the first shots (after the obligatory, slow rise of a red-hued symbolic sun) are the skeletons of buildings being razed to make way for the building of the vast National Stadium. Covering the athletes in the 50km walk, the camera zeroes in on their rear ends, which jauntily swish from side to side as the runners try to keep from breaking into a trot. At the time, in fact, the Olympic Organizing Board complained that the artistic guidelines of the film had overshadowed the recording of events, and asked that it be re-edited. With humor and verve, Bahram Beyzaie’s Iranian New Wave classic captures a moment in Iranian history when dissent against the authoritarian shah was beginning to percolate below the surface. A spectacle of magnificent proportions and remarkable intimacy, Kon Ichikawa’s TOKYO OLYMPIAD remains one of the greatest films ever made about sports. I remember Ernest Hemingway telling me once that the unnoticed things in the hands of a good writer had an effect, and a powerful one, of making readers conscious of what they had been aware of only subconsciously. Unraveling Pop Culture One Thread at a Time, Kon Ishikawa's "Tokyo Olympiad." Honing in on two athletes in particular — Ababe Bikila from Ethopia, and Ahamed Isa from the then-newly-formed country of Chad — Ishikawa pays tribute to the people who dedicate their lives and bodies to compete for themselves and their host nations. Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. A spectacle of magnificent proportions and remarkable intimacy, Kon Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad remains one of the greatest films ever made about sports. 3. An exhausted face. Always Ichikawa pays great attention to matters of small moment: Many close-ups. Shipping $3.00. Tokyo Olympiad comes with a brand new 1080p HD transfer on Blu-ray in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio that looks phenomenal and quite possibly the best it's ever looked..

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